It’s been an interesting year. In addition to the emergence of the novel Coronavirus that forced half the world to shut down and peaceful protests transformed into the some of the worst race riots since the 60’s, our little corner of the world has experienced the hottest temperatures on record since 1895.

And it looks like our temperatures will stay up there for the rest of the summer at least, even with the rainy season in full swing. Oh, and don’t forget the predictions of a more active than usual hurricane season as well.

Temperatures Risin’

As you might recall from high school biology, insects are cold-blooded creatures. That means they flourish in times like these and tend to go into a hibernation-style mode when it gets colder. Of course, we’re used to year round warmth and bugs here on the Gulf Coast of Florida. But the hotter than usual winter, even here, leads to accelerated insect life cycles – and more bugs.

With the sporadic rains already underway, the mosquitoes we got a slight respite from in the Spring are now coming back full force. And they’re not the only ones.

House Flies

Think you’re seeing more of this nasty household pest? You are. The typical house fly egg hatches in 18-24 hours. But when the mercury rises, that time is cut drastically. At 99-degrees, they can emerge in less than 8 hours! In just 4 days, the 900 eggs the one Musca domestica that snuck in laid – becomes full grown house flies everywhere!

In case you’ve forgotten how disgusting these bugs are, they are constantly eating and pooping. They contaminate everything they land on with their feces, plus whatever other garbage they ate. Especially in temperatures like these, once your home is invaded, you’ll need a professional to eradicate the problem.

Wasps, Hornets & Yellowjackets

Even though so-called “Murder Hornets” aren’t really a concern for us here in Florida (or really anywhere in the U.S.), their stinging cousins are a factor. Once the temperatures rise into the 90’s, the wasp and hornet nests can double in size in just a week.

And be careful swatting at them or their mud-daub nests. You’ve heard the term ‘mad as a hornet’? Well, it’s even truer during hot summers. As these flying insects find themselves starved for moisture, they’re far more likely to be aggressive and sting.

But please, know the difference and let the friendly honey bee do its essential work.

Sahara Desert Ant

Of course, there are some bugs who can withstand truly hot conditions. While we don’t see them around here, the Sahara Desert Ant can manage the hottest temperatures on the face of the earth – 131 degrees! They even use the heat to “hunt,” feeding off insects who roast in the hot sun.

The red imported fire ants whose ant hills we see springing up in our yards are not nearly as resilient to the hot weather. Thankfully, temperatures here rarely reach that high, but if they stay warm, there’s a slim chance you’ll find fire ants indoors. They’re much more likely to travel inside to higher ground when the rains are heavy and their nests flood.

Thankfully, whatever kind of bug is invading your sanctuary, we here at Good News Pest Solutions have dealt with it. We have more than 30 years of experience taking care of creepy crawlies with the safest, most reliable solutions. Our most popular product is our Green Perimeter Plus solution that provides protection for your home and yard without any harsh chemicals.

Most of our work happens outside of your home with minimal chance of COVID-19 exposure. And we always take extra precautions when we have to enter your home. For more information, or to schedule your first appointment, just give us a call!

WDO Inspection
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